Don’t fall for the coca cola car wrap scam

The latest scam making the rounds is the coca cola car wrap scam.

Actually, it could be any well-known company but, at the time that she sent me the link over in Facebook Messenger, it was coca cola.

When I clicked on it while writing this post (yes, I clicked the exact same link), the scammers had changed it to Blue Oak Energy.

(Here is the link if you are interested. I am not hyperlinking it so you will have to copy and paste.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1eISjdCuf4q5B4jvsis_duPDHPLm4a1El61KkFSDVQ0g/viewform)

My involvement began when a good friend forwarded me a google document to sign up to put a sign on my vehicle advertising coca cola.

For years now, I have been looking for a legitimate “paid to drive” auto wrap company.

You May Also Like:  Tweevip is a Twitter Scam

I know that their are companies that actually do this because their is a car in my local area who I’ve seen with my own 2 eyes painted up in Lucky Charms, Frosted Flakes, and Trix cereal advertisements.

Some companies pay you to have your entire car wrapped in their advertisement.

While others pay you to simply place their decal on your vehicle.

Either way, it is not suppose to interrupt your life and you are to drive around as per your usual.

So, I was skeptical because I have seen this scam many times before.

But, if it is legit then…Yay, money!!

You May Also Like:  Tweevip is a Twitter Scam

If it is a scam, at least I will know for sure and I can spread the word with this post.

In the mail came the check with, you guessed it, the  request that I deposit the check, take out my cut, and forward the rest.

They even had the nerve to be sloppy enough to send me a letter stating that I signed up to do a Walmart Survey rather than the vinyl door decals that I was expecting.

And, oh, don’t be confused by the fact that they didn’t cheap out with mailing it either.

They actually used the United States Postal Service’s Priority Mail envelopes rather than a simple stamp and envelope set-up. (Hm. Does this reach the level of mail fraud, I wonder?)

You May Also Like:  Tweevip is a Twitter Scam

So, what would have happened if I had done so.

That check would have bounced so high only God would have been able to catch it.

Don’t do it.

Just don’t do it!

And, please, please, share this post.

Many people are desperate and do not know any better.

The elderly are especially vulnerable to scams.

I will admit to haven fallen for scams before. Leave a comment and let me know if you have you ever fallen for a scam? Have you fallen for this or similar scam?

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

  

  

  

CommentLuv badge

interproportional-find